Smoked Venison Jambalaya

Smoked venison jambalaya, how to make jambalaya, deer jambalaya recipe, how to smoke a deer roast, smoked venison roast, jambalaya recipe with deer

I’ve seen a lot of jambalaya recipes with chicken and seafood, but I haven’t seen many using venison. Much less smoked venison! So I decided to give it a try! The staple of this recipe, the smoked venison roast, could be used for countless recipes, including good old fashioned BBQ sandwiches. I also made venison andouille sausage to go in this recipe. You can follow my method for venison andouille here. As with any piece of venison to be used, there is a story as to where it came from, and this one is no different. I was fortunate to get this nice buck on November 11, 2012! So it was time to celebrate and cook up something good!

What you will need:

Small to medium venison roast, clean and free of silver skin and fat

Andouille sausage

1/3 cup chopped onion

1/3 cup chopped bell pepper

1/3 cup chopped celery

1/3 cup diced tomato

Chopped green onion

Olive oil

Chicken broth

2 cups instant long grain rice

Cajun seasoning

Creole butter injectable marinade, or your favorite flavor injectable marinade

Sliced bacon

Hickory, pecan or apple wood or chunks

Start with a clean venison roast, free from silver skin and fat. I used a small roast that I cut from the top round.

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Inject the roast with the injectable marinade. Season it with the Cajun seasoning, then wrap with bacon, and season again with the Cajun seasoning.

Smoked venison jambalaya, how to make jambalaya, deer jambalaya recipe, how to smoke a deer roast, smoked venison roast, jambalaya recipe with deer

Smoke the roast at 250° until the internal temp is around 120°-130°. Then place the roast in an aluminum pan and cover it with aluminum foil, creating a “dome” over the roast with the foil. Place the roast back on the smoker or grill and continue to cook at 200° – 250° for another couple of hours, or until the internal temperature reaches 165°. The temperatures that I list here are approximate. It is very important to not overcook the roast to prevent drying out. However, the bacon and the injection will go a long ways to prevent it from drying out. The best rule of thumb is to check the roast once you have reached 145° to test the consistency and level of doneness. Venison does not have the connective fat tissue that a pork butt does, so the margin for error is tremendously less. I got this one perfect, pulling it at 165°, and it fell apart, shredding just like pulled pork. It took 1 1/2 hours to get it to 120°, at which point I wrapped it and let it go for another 2 1/2 hours at 225°. Notice the smoke ring and the shredded consistency.

Smoked venison jambalaya, how to make jambalaya, deer jambalaya recipe, how to smoke a deer roast, smoked venison roast, jambalaya recipe with deer

 

Smoked venison jambalaya, how to make jambalaya, deer jambalaya recipe, how to smoke a deer roast, smoked venison roast, jambalaya recipe with deer

Smoked venison jambalaya, how to make jambalaya, deer jambalaya recipe, how to smoke a deer roast, smoked venison roast, jambalaya recipe with deer

This would make great BBQ sandwiches!! But, to make the jambalaya, lightly sauté the onions, celery and bell pepper in olive oil. Slice the andouille sausage and add to the pan as the vegetables are starting to soften. Add the diced tomato and season with Cajun seasoning, reducing the heat to low. Boil the instant rice in chicken broth for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork and add it to the pan with the sausage and vegetables, mixing well. Add the shredded smoked venison and mix well, followed by another dash or two of Cajun seasoning. Serve it hot, garnished with chopped green onion and a dash of Louisiana hot sauce.

 

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